The rhyolite volcanoes at Laguna del Maule, Chile, are exhibiting extraordinarily rapid uplift, likely due to the addition of significant quantities of magma into the crust at shallow depths. This area has experienced cataclysmic eruptions in the past, and offers a unique chance to explore the dynamics of rhyolite, the most explosive magma type, before the next eruption. During this five-year project, an international team will explore the evolution of the volcanic field using geochemistry and geophysics to create a model of subsurface activity. Our ultimate goal is to fill in the many blank spaces about what occurs during the centuries and decades that precede the biggest eruptions on Earth.
Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field is in the Southern Andes.  Other active volcanoes at red dots.  Epicenter of the February 27, 2010 magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake is at the red star.

Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field is in the Southern Andes. Other active volcanoes at red dots. Epicenter of the February 27, 2010 magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake is at the red star.

Southern hemisphere globe

This project is a collaboration between the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Observatorio volcanológico de los Andes del Sur (OVDAS), Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), Georgia Tech, Cornell, University of Alberta, Simon Fraser University, University of Chile-Santiago, University of Concepcion-Chile, The United States Geological Survey (USGS), Servicio Geológico Minero Argentino (SEGEMAR), The Nanyang Technological University-Singapore, and the National University-San Juan-Argentina.  It is supported principally by the U.S. National Science Foundation.NSF logo